6 Ways Marketing in 2019 Prepared Us for 2020

6 Ways Marketing in 2019 Prepared Us for 2020

Doing a marketing overview for 2019 is a little like asking, ‘How long is a piece of string?’  Every area of selling – from platforms to tools – is buzzing with technological change. We’re seeing the profound shifting of businesses, processes and models through the use of multiple digital technologies, enhancing brand visibility, speed and sales. This article looks at six key things which have prepared the marketing landscape in 2019 for even more innovation in 2020.

  1. “Effectiveness wins the battle over efficiency.” Sarah Vizard

They sound interchangeable but the definition of effectiveness is, “The degree to which something is successful in producing a desired result”, versus the meaning of efficiency, “The ratio of the useful work performed in a process to the total energy expended”. In other words, brands prioritising long term success over a shorter sighted ROI (return on investment) looked strong in 2019.

 

  1. “Digital transformation can orchestrate and personalise the entire end-to-end customer experience, moment to moment, at scale, on any channel, in real time.” CMO by Adobe

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is fittingly poised on the brink of a marketing landscape truly worthy of science fiction. These new technologies within AI and the Internet of Things (iOT) have pushed marketing into frontiers which are taking personalisation into the area of customer knowledge previously known to only family and friends.  This means having, as Todd Dipaola writes, “An understanding at of AI at broader and deeper levels, delivering more personalised and contextually relevant advertising. Customer experience management (CXM) is top of mind for companies.”

  1. “Mastering Marketing Mix Modelling (MMM) allows marketers to create magic moments.” Techcrunch

Marketing mix modelling (also known as MMM) is being more broadly used to enhance advertising offerings and promotions improving ROI.  TechCrunch  explains the effectiveness of using MMM to enhance the customer experience:

“The explosion of data and identity management, combined with technical advancements in real-time signal detection and machine learning, present new opportunities to respond to consumers, but mastering this ability enables marketers to create ‘magic moments’ – instances of hyper-relevant content, delivered at the perfect time and place.”

 

  1. “Measure what matters – smart data over big data.”

According to Marcel Deer, in 2020 we can expect to have 20 billion IoT devices collecting data for analysis and in large tech corporations business leaders are now synergizing assistive technology to run more intelligent data analytics. So from 2019 onwards prioritising how we quantify data will be make or break. It is no longer an option for marketers to rely on big data with no quality metrics as this these continue to spew out key audience assumptions which may not be true.

 

  1. “Brand messages reached 561% further when shared by employees vs the same messages shared via official brand social channels.” MSL Group

The average survival rate of businesses is quite a sobering one, 79% last for one year, 50% for five and 33% over ten years and if the stats from 2019 tell us anything about holistic marketing it is to treat internal marketing as seriously as external marketing. While we are so caught up in technology and data management we can’t lose sight of the fact that that much of customer experience is still in the hands of humans. Attracting and retaining the best people is still one of the key ways to win big points in the marketing battleground.

 

  1. “Eliminating the CMO position sets the brand free from the confines of marketing, reuniting it with the business.” Forrester

According to a report done by Forrester, Chief Marketing Officers (CMOs) are facing a “final desperate fight for survival” and what we saw in 2019 seems to support this as McDonald’s, Uber and Johnson & Johnson no longer CMOs. The trend in 2020 will be to have “One designated C-suite leader will be responsible for all that surrounds the customer, clarifying the role of marketing in a business environment obsessed with growth.”

 

In closing, some stats to indicate just how extraordinary the years to follow 2019 will be:

  • There are more than 7,040 different marketing technology solutions available.
  • By December 2019 $4,704,038,648 was pledged to Kickstarter projects and a total 175,086 of successfully funded projects.
  • There are 700,000 podcasts and 29 million podcast episodes, up 27% from 2018, and lastly;
  • 70% of marketers say their companies expect marketing to be the primary source of business growth in 2020.

Jainita Khatri, Managing Director, Prana Business Consulting

About Prana Business Consulting

Prana Business Consulting is a marketing partner to your business.  Using omni-channel principles, Prana builds a connection between your brand and your client. Prana drives high performance and tangible results in Marketing, Branding, CRM and Social Media. Prana leverages industry specialists to deliver customized solutions for baby, beauty, health and wellness brands, locally and internationally. Prana is a level 1 BBBEE certified company.

Email: info@pranabusinessconsulting.com

Phone: +27 (0) 11 794 1409 / + 27 (0) 83 414 9796

Facebook / YouTube / Twitter / LinkedIn

Eight Tools to Create Project Plans and Deliver Marketing Success

Anyone with a business strives for success but not everyone systematically implements the project plan tools which are readily available to assist with marketing. This may be because many of the resources seem too academic or perhaps it’s the sheer volume of information which is daunting. In this article I highlight eight tools which can be used to create a solid project plan, helping create the strategic backbone to marketing success.

For project plans to produce the desired results they need to integrate, support and inform marketing strategy, development and direction. A project plan can be made up of one or more of the business tools below which include matrices and models to help identify almost every aspect of a business, from brand purpose, role players, actions, insights, competitors and company growth.

 

1) Project Charter

 

“If you don’t know where you are going. How can you expect to get there?” Basil S. Walsh

Creating a Project Charter is recommended for someone in project management who needs to identify, get buy in, track and measure a specific project. It outlines the:

  • Breadth of project
  • Goals
  • Who is involved and their responsibilities.

A Project Charter should:

  • Encapsulate the project’s purpose
  • Keep the people involved on the same page
  • Be a contract between the project sponsor, key stakeholders and the project team.

SmartSheet has Project Charter useful templates available for free download in word or excel.

 

 

2) Project Plan

 

“Plans are worthless. Planning is essential.” Dwight D. Eisenhower

 

While a Project Charter is an overview of a project, often to get buy in and approval for the framework, a Project Plan works on the approved structure and framework of the charter.

Bright Hub Project Management outlines the following points on how a Project Plan assists with the specific detail on executing, managing and controlling:

  • Project Value Proposition
  • People involved and their responsibilities
  • Business structure
  • What needs to be done
  • Phases, activities and tasks
  • Identification the work breakdown structure (WBS)
  • Allocation of resources
  • Time lines and milestones or critical path schedule (CPS)
  • Documentation of project inter-dependencies.

There are various ways to create a Project Plan but the traditional Microsoft Project Templates always work effectively, or explore the option of using a free Gantt Chart template.

 

3) Project Plan Scope Triangle

 

“Time is the most valuable thing a man can spend.” Theophrastus

 

The Scope Triangle has been used in project training programmes for over 25 years and is a useful tool to use when looking at the three “primary forces” of a project as well as if, when and where a “trade off” between them is necessary:

  • Time
  • Quality

As Nick Jenkins, from Project Smart says, “The best project managers will juggle all three like hot potatoes and will make decisions every day which effectively trade-off time versus quality versus resources.”

 

4) Ansoff’s Matrix

 

“Management is, above all, a practice where art, science, and craft meet.” Henry Mintzberg

 

This strategic planning tool dates back to the 1960s and is named after its creator, Russian American mathematician and business manager, Harry Igor Ansoff, also known as the “father of strategic management”.

The Matrix is based on Ansoff’s definition of product-market strategy as being: “A joint statement of a product line and the corresponding set of missions which the products are designed to fulfil.” Within the axis of existing / new markets and existing /new products are:

  • Market penetration
  • Market development
  • Product development and;

The benefit of using Ansoff’s Matrix (also known as the Product/Market Expansion Grid) is that it can be used to, as MindTools explains, “Identify alternative growth strategies by looking at present and potential products in current and future markets.”

 

5) The Boston Matrix

“The major reason for setting a goal is for what it makes of you to accomplish it. What it makes of you will always be the far greater value than what you get.” Jim Rohn

 

The Boston Matrix uses the axis of Relevant Market Share in relation to Relevant Market Growth to chart portfolios within a business, defined as:

  • Dogs – Products with low growth or market share
  • Question Marks or Problem Child – Products in high growth markets with low market share
  • Stars – Products in high growth markets with high market share
  • Cash Cows – Products in low growth markets with high market share.

I’ve included this matrix as it is useful for companies with separate business units or diverse products, but as Strategic Management Insights points out, it needs to be used by following these steps –

  • Choose the unit
  • Define the market
  • Calculate relative market share
  • Find out market growth rate, and;
  • Draw the circles on a matrix.

 

 

6) Gartner’s Hype Cycle

 

“Realistically, the world (and the technology) aren’t quite ready for autonomous flying taxis.” Kasey Panetta

Unlike most of the tools on this list, Gartner’s Hype Cycle positions us firmly in the 21st Century. It’s described as, “A graphic representation of the maturity and adoption of technologies and applications, and how they are potentially relevant to solving real business problems and exploiting new opportunities.” But, more simply put, it’s positioning your product or business within a technology curve of expectation and time to see where it is / isn’t potentially relevant to the marketplace.

Gatner’s project tool drills down into the five key phases of a technology’s life cycle:

  • Innovation Trigger
  • Peak of Inflated Expectations
  • Trough of Disillusionment
  • Slope of Enlightenment
  • Plateau of Productivity.

Which – as they explain – helps to “separate the hype from the real”. For further insights on this, read 5 Trends Emerge in the Gartner Hype Cycle for Emerging Technologies.

 

 

7) System Development Lifecycle (SDLC)

“Operations keeps the lights on, strategy provides a light at the end of the tunnel, but project management is the train engine that moves the organisation forward.” Joy Gumz

Over the last 15 years I have consciously or unconsciously used the SDLC model in many projects including helping start ups with business plans, building marketing strategies, supporting change management and of course developing IT solutions. This simple model is an method in defining the steps in the project plan through there are various other tools.

The SDLC, also known as the Application Development Life-Cycle, describes the process (often used in IT and Systems) is for planning, creating, testing, and deploying an process or information system.

There are six key stages in the SDLC cycle:

  • Analysis
  • Design
  • Development and Testing
  • Implementation
  • Documentation, and;

An additional note on the importance of this from Innovative Architects: ”The life cycle approach of any project is a time-consuming process. Even though some steps are more difficult than others, none are to be overlooked. An oversight could prevent the entire system from functioning as planned.”

For additional project planning tools Smart Insights have an article with more suggestions, including SWOT Analysis, the BCG Matrix, more on the Product Lifecycle Model, the Pestle Analysis Model and the BCG Matrix.

 

8) Bespoke Project Planning Tools

“Vision without action is a dream. Action without vision is simply passing the time. Action with Vision is making a positive difference.” Joel Barker

At Prana Business Consulting we also create bespoke project planning tools based on our experience as well as specific client needs.

  • Prana Business Flow Pyramid
  • B2B marketing model
  • Digital marketing Flowchart, and our
  • Marketing to Moms Model.

 

Jainita Khatri, Managing Director, Prana Business Consulting

Written by Jainita Khatri. She is the founder of Prana Business Consulting and has 15 years of practical experience in marketing for blue chip organisations and has consulted extensively with entrepreneurial and medium sized businesses. Jainita’s passion lies in digital marketing – helping businesses to build their brands and businesses. Jainita is a speaker at conferences and guest lectures Monash University and UJ on various marketing related topics.

 

 

About Prana Business Consulting

Prana Business Consulting is a marketing partner to your business.  Using omni-channel principles, Prana builds a connection between your brand and your client. Prana drives high performance and tangible results in Marketing, Branding, CRM and Social Media. Prana leverages industry specialists to deliver customized solutions for baby, beauty, health and wellness brands, locally and internationally. Prana is a level 1 BBBEE certified company.

Email: info@pranabusinessconsulting.com.www82.jnb2.host-h.net

Phone: +27 (0) 11 794 1409 / + 27 (0) 83 414 9796

Facebook / YouTube / Twitter / LinkedIn

 

Successful Brands: Leading, Challenging and Exploring

Coca-Cola dividing their products into three categories – leaders, challengers and explorers is a good way of defining the future of any brand. Those who are successful need to be at least one of these, preferably two, ideally all three. Here are five ways I see brands (and a continent) leading, challenging and exploring in 2019.

1) Uber-Agile

“The only way to remain in business is creating brands. The moment we stop creating brands then the e-retailers are going to rule.” Javier Meza, CMO of Sparkling at Coca-Cola

In an interview with Marketing Week  CMO of Sparkling at Coca-Cola, Javier Meza, shared how the brand remains current by aiming to be extraordinarily agile. He said in Japan, for example, the business was launching two new products a week. Each product is tracked for six weeks and then a decision is made whether to keep or cull.

There’s now a separate entity for Coca-Cola called Global Ventures who scale new products as the business diversifies away from fizzy drinks. Rodolfo Echeverria, Coca-Cola’s global vice-president of creative, says explorer brands require “a typical West Coast, California attitude” which means looking towards healthier products. In China, for example, they have recently launched a tea brand for the eighth time as well as having Coca-Cola Clear with lemon. In Japan the brand has Coke Plus Fibre, which lowers the body’s fat absorption and is targeted at over-40 year olds.

Other big players we can expect to see being uber-agile in 2019 are Samsung (who spent around US$15.3 billion on research and development in 2018), Volkswagen and Apple. But will they be swift enough to match Amazon’s meteoric innovation? Bearing in mind Amazon’s R&D spend in 2018 was a cool US$22.6 billion.

2) On-Site Robotic Personalisation

“There are new possibilities for self-assembly, replication, repair in our physical structures, our buildings, machines.” Skylar Tibbits, Founder of the Self-Assembly Lab

The Ministry of Supply in collaboration with MIT’s Self-Assembly Lab in the US are rolling out a service which introduces the next level of on-site robotic personalisation. Now robots will resize a jersey (or sweater) to fit you while you wait.

Skylar Tibbits, Founder of the Self-Assembly Lab speaks of the innovation, saying there’s something psychologically rewarding about watching a garment transform before your eyes, “You want to see that it’s actually active, that it’s alive and transforming with you and around you.” This is the future of customisable products – not just fashion – robotics sprinkling electronic fairy dust and personalising your product while you wait.

3) I’m Still Standing: Bricks and Mortar 

“We’ve found that interacting with the brand in store makes a customer more loyal.” Paul Hedrick, CEO of direct-to-consumer cowboy boot startup Tecovas

Retailers housed in bricks and mortar will still be around but not necessarily in a way we’re used to. Some of the new stores going up are to support their online sales offering, designed to complement the customer’s digital experience. Digital retailers Everlane, for instance, created technology in a bricks and mortar setting, with the checkout using online customer profiles and their saved credit card details. As VendHQ writes, “Technology will fuel – not curb – the rise of brick and mortar retail.”

We are also seeing some retailers launch stores which stay open all hours. For example, BookXcess in Malaysia has just opened its doors to the country’s biggest-ever bookstore and it will stay open twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week.

Within the shop of 3,437m² they stock half a million books. The space (more like a mall) also has individual reading areas and a cafe to entice readers to stay for longer.  We may see more stores like these in the Asia Pacific region as their middle class is predicted to rise  to 65% of the continent’s population by 2030, and physical 24/7 is a way of shopping which suits their lifestyle.

4) More Specialised: Less Spend

“2019 will be the year of conspicuous conservation.” Elizabeth Segran, FastCompany

While brands are working overtime to meet customer needs there are real benefits in store (and app!) for the person who wants to streamline their consumer spend. The recent reveal at CES 2019 of L’Oreal’s My Skin Track pH is an example of this. It’s touted as the first “wearable sensor and companion app to easily measure personal skin pH levels and create customized product regimens.” If it works as well as promised the reality will be ways of really knowing what our skin needs and less experimenting with products, therefore less wastage.

The My Skin Track opens intriguing doors to the future of beauty, health and technology, but brands need to hold on to the human touch. I recently read a list of ways the BBC World Service engages younger audiences which can be applied to what customers want. They are: update me, give me perspective, educate me, keep me on trend, amuse me and inspire me.

5) Brand Africa and the Wisdom of emerging markets

“90% of the media’s 24/7 coverage is concerned with the West, whereas 90% of the opportunity is in emerging markets.” Stephen Jennings, CEO, Renaissance Capital

According to Africa Business Communities, the World Bank estimates economic growth in the Sub-Saharan regions to be at a positive 6% average in 2019-20 and McKinsey says Africa is the world’s next “big growth market”.  CBNC Africa also reports there’s a trillion-dollar opportunity to industrialise Africa, “meeting rising domestic demand and create a bridge-head in global export markets.”

But tt’s not only in the business facts and figures that position the continent of Africa to become a powerful challenging and exploring brand – it is the people. We’ll be seeing more ideas and products being created by Africans to meet our most pressing needs. For example Nigerian college student, Segun Oyeyiola, recently upcycled a Volkswagen Beetle and turned it into a wind and solar-powered car, made up of scrap parts, for less than US$6,000, paving the way for more local innovation in this field.

With consumer spending in Africa expected to hit $25 trillion by 2025, our emerging markets are amazing opportunities for international trade and growth, but it will be our spirit of Ubuntu (a quality representing compassion and humanity) which will keep Africa creating innovative products to improve quality of life.

Jainita Khatri, Managing Director, Prana Business Consulting

 

Written by Jainita Khatri. She is the founder of Prana Business Consulting and has 15 years of practical experience in marketing for blue chip organisations and has consulted extensively with entrepreneurial and medium sized businesses. Jainita’s passion lies in digital marketing – helping businesses to build their brands and businesses. Jainita is a speaker at conferences and guest lectures Monash University and UJ on various marketing related topics.

 

About Prana Business Consulting

Prana Business Consulting is a marketing partner to your business.  Using omni-channel principles, Prana builds a connection between your brand and your client. Prana drives high performance and tangible results in Marketing, Branding, CRM and Social Media. Prana leverages industry specialists to deliver customized solutions for baby, beauty, health and wellness brands, locally and internationally. Prana is a level 1 BBBEE certified company.

Email: info@pranabusinessconsulting.com.www82.jnb2.host-h.net

Phone: +27 (0) 11 794 1409 / + 27 (0) 83 414 9796

Facebook / YouTube / Twitter / LinkedIn

 

The Humanising Factor #BizTrends2019

The Humanising Factor #BizTrends2019

In 2019 marketers will be focused on how to best implement the potential wave of artificial intelligence flooding our homes, vehicles, online habits and workplace. But there are important humanising pockets of influence which brands should also take note of. Here are four consumer needs we’ll also be responding to as marketers in 2019.

 

1) Intellectual Snack Breaks with Podcasts

Taking intellectual snack breaks in 2019 will be a necessity to counteract the social media junk food we’re force fed at every consumer touch-point. Where will thoughtful people go when they need to take a break? Very likely somewhere that doesn’t require a screen and provides snackable content, as podcasts do.

Just the  iTunes podcast stats are impressive, it is home to over 525,000 active shows, with more than 18.5 million episodes available, with content in over 100 languages. In an online survey conducted by Nielsen of 7,000 podcast listeners between the ages of 18 to 49 – 69% said the podcast ads made them aware of new products and services.

The five most popular podcasting genres in the US are Society and Culture, Business, Comedy, News and Politics and Health. 19% of listeners increase their listening speed (listen faster) and weekly podcast listeners spend an average of 6 hours 37 minutes per week listening to podcasts. That’s a lot of listening space for brands to tap in to.  Check out the informative and thought provoking Tim Ferris Show to see (and hear) how it’s done.

2) Packaging with Care (and Collaboration)

Products making eco-friendly waves – like L’Oreal  – who has gone as far as launching a new brand called Seed Phytonutrients. The goal for these products is to be separate from L’Oreal and to create “non-synthetic, effective products that support small-scale organic farmers”.

In 2019 you’ll see the words, “craft” and “natural-origin” used more often and if the packaging of Seed products is anything to go by (compostable bottles made from post-consumer paper, combined with clay) the wave of eco-design and product with gather momentum.

Big retailers branching out into natural origin packaging creates opportunities for organic producers and community businesses. Manufacturers will be also be more accountable as to where they source their ingredients as consumers can follow the supply chain journey.

3) Planet or Plastic

In October 2018 the European Union voted overwhelmingly to ban a wide range of single-use plastics in every member state and New Zealand is the latest country to ban single-use plastic shopping bags, which were being used at an incredible 750 million bags per year – about 150 bags per person.

Closer to home Woolworths, The Shoprite Group and Pick n Pay are making inroads into more sustainable plastic bag offerings with good news from Plastics|SA who say South Africa has an input recycling rate of 43.7% above Europe’s recycling figure of 31.1%.

Woolworths’s commitment to zero packaging waste and making all packaging recyclable or reusable by 2022 is ahead of most international retailers and producers whose similar targets are being implemented by 2025. Woolworths are trial-ing a new in-store bag for R5.50 – reusable and locally-made from recycled materials. Their partner is South African small black enterprise development company, Isikwama, who employ and up-skill people from the local community.

Shoprite and Checkers have introduced ‘planet’ bags which are 100% recycled and recyclable plastic costing R3.00 each. Their strategy is to give customers using the planet bag 50c off their tab. A lot of their vegetable packaging will also be in biodegradable and compostable containers from November 2018.

Pick n Pay is introducing South Africa’s first compostable supermarket bag made of vegetable matter, including maize and potato starch. These bags break down after about six months compared to the 500 to a thousand years it takes for an ordinary plastic bag decompose.

Another thing we’ll see more of  next year are  “reverse vending” machines which eat goods for recycling. They are being tested by Tesco in the UK and Woolworths in its flagship green store, in Palmyra, Cape Town.

Other retailers take note, as Jeremy Sampson, Director at Brand Finance Africa, says: “It isn’t unheard of now for shoppers to prefer one supermarket brand over another, purely because they express a serious commitment to recycled content in packaging or encourage their shoppers to bring their bags every time they shop.”

 

4) Embracing Zen (or at least the App)

 Trendsetters Virgin Australia have taken mindfulness to a whole new level – 30,000 feet above ground, to be exact. Partnering with Smiling Mind, an app which helps to create a mindful life, the airline now has mediation on their in flight entertainment, encouraging passengers to practice mindfulness during their flight. But that’s not all; you can also take a yoga class in the Sydney Virgin Australia Lounge while you wait for your next flight.

Mindfulness is on the rise and you’ll find new “zen” apps gently jostling for space on your Smart Phone in 2019, edging your fitness apps to one side. For brands and retailers the opportunity lies in capturing the heart of the mindful consumer.

In the words of Poppy Jamie, creator of the Happy Not Perfect app, “How do we make sure that our technology is helping us feel better rather than worse? How can we wake up in the morning and like ourselves first?” Here are the best Mindfulness apps from The New York Times to help you on your way.

 

Jainita Khatri, Managing Director, Prana Business Consulting

Written by Jainita Khatri. She is the founder of Prana Business Consulting and has 15 years of practical experience in marketing for blue chip organisations and has consulted extensively with entrepreneurial and medium sized businesses. Jainita’s passion lies in digital marketing – helping businesses to build their brands and businesses. Jainita is a speaker at conferences and guest lectures Monash University and UJ on various marketing related topics.

About Prana Business Consulting

Prana Business Consulting is a marketing partner to your business.  Using omni-channel principles, Prana builds a connection between your brand and your client. Prana drives high performance and tangible results in Marketing, Branding, CRM and Social Media. Prana leverages industry specialists to deliver customized solutions for baby, beauty, health and wellness brands, locally and internationally. Prana is a level 1 BBBEE certified company.

Email: info@pranabusinessconsulting.com.www82.jnb2.host-h.net

Phone: +27 (0) 11 794 1409 / + 27 (0) 83 414 9796

Facebook / YouTube / Twitter / LinkedIn

 

Machine learning and marketing automation – What is Machine Learning?

Machine learning is an application of artificial intelligence (AI) that provides systems the ability to automatically learn and improve ( marketing automation) from experience without being explicitly programmed. Machine learning focuses on the development of computer programs that can access data and use it learn for themselves.

 

For example, facial recognition software learns by being fed datasets of labelled pictures, and trying to guess which contain faces and which don’t, until it can eventually identify faces with a high degree of accuracy. Eventually, with enough data, the software can even learn to recognise who is in the picture (this is how Facebook’s tagging prompts work).

 

The process of learning begins with observations or data, such as examples, direct experience, or instruction, in order to look for patterns in data and make better decisions in the future based on the examples that we provide. The primary aim is to allow the computers learn automatically without human intervention or assistance and adjust actions accordingly.

 

The purpose of marketing automation software solutions is to help you deliver quality content to the right people efficiently, so that you may increase your sales and fortify your company’s branding. It is equipped with a plethora of tools that let you create campaigns, identify quality leads, improve your content, and manage your emails and social media accounts.

 

Whether you own a large business that executes long sales cycles or a start-up company that doesn’t have enough staff to manage marketing campaigns full-time, marketing automation can ease your troubles. Here are some of its features:

  • Campaign Automation
  • Social Media Management
  • Email Management
  • Content Management
  • Lead Nurturing
  • Lead Scoring
  • Lead Conversion Tracking
  • Customer Segmentation
  • A/B Testing
  • Campaign Tracking and Reporting
  • Customer Engagement Analytics
  • ROI Analytics
  • Website and CRM Integration

 

 

How to Integrate Messaging Apps In Your Marketing Strategy

More than ever, online marketers have more reasons to implement messaging technology to engage their customers. This is especially true for those in e-commerce and online retail sales.

Research data continue to show us that time spent on messaging apps is constantly on the rise, with no end in sight. Dark social platforms such as messaging, email, and private browsing account for almost 70 percent of online referrals when it comes to sharing.

Most popular global mobile messenger apps as of July 2018, based on number of monthly active users (in millions)

 

 

Here are some examples as demonstrated by the brands that have implemented Messaging Apps to improve customer service, increase website conversions, and generate a loyal following.

  1. Using Bots To Make Shopping Easier
  2. Make Checkouts Easy with Payments Via Messenger Apps
  3. Go full-throttle with in-app shopping?
  4. Engage Your Customers Through Public Chats To Keep Your Brand In Their Heads
  5. Use Messaging Apps to Conduct Contests, Promotions and Other Gimmicks
  6. Make Your Own Emoticons and Stickers Unique to Your Brand

 

 

Conclusion

Messaging apps have over 5B monthly active users worldwide. With this kind of growth in user base and penetration, it is no longer a question of whether it’s time to start engaging customers through messaging apps. The more pertinent challenge is how we can harness this technology in a way that would improve how we transact with them.

 

Reference:

https://snaps.io/heres-chatbots-best-ai-marketing-automation-tool/

https://www.click.co.uk/blog/chatbots-future-messaging/

https://searchengineland.com/machine-learning-marketings-future-270626

 

 

Written by Prisha Debipersad, Prisha has a love for travel and has lived in Germany and Australia, gaining work and life experience along the way. Being proudly South African she is happy to be back on her home ground. She currently is completing her masters degree as well as providing valuable support to Prana as a Marketing Assistant. .

 

Integrating marketing activities into the customer lifecycle

 

What is the origin of the term ‘lifecycle marketing’?

Lifecycle marketing is the process of providing your audience the kinds communications and experiences they need, want, or like as they move from prospects to customers then, ideally, to advocates.

Generally, a lifecycle marketing plan is a three-phase framework, Attract, Sell, and Wow. Each phase consists of three stages that include basic strategies and tactics that coalesce into a single, self-sustaining process. Rolling out a customer lifecycle marketing plan is a lot easier when done in these phases and can be done quickly and affordably with easy-to-use automation technology.

 

The attract phase

The goal of the Attract Phase is to get the attention of the consumers you want to buy your products or service. The stages include Target, Attract Interest, and Collect Leads.

  • Target – Targeting is when you identify specific types of individuals then address them directly with your marketing. Most common ways to target an audience are by interests, behaviour, demographics, location, context, (targeting by topic on the page which is matched with the corresponding message of your ad to reach and connect to an audience with an interest in your product or service), device, etc.
  • Attract Interest– Attract visitors to your website with great content like e-books, infographics, research reports, webinars, social media, and blog posts.
  • Collect leads – Use a web form that includes offers, free consultations or premium content to encourage visitors to sign up for your email list.

The sell phase

Sell is the second phase of the Lifecycle Marketing model. This is your unique strategy that makes your product or service the obvious choice when those you’ve attracted are ready to buy. Sell Phase stages are Educate, Offer, and Close.

  • Educate – Create a consistent campaign of useful information with automated, personalized follow-up messages.
  • Offer – The best way to craft an offer is to observe past customer actions and create a buying process map, then provide an irresistible offer.
  • Close – Closing the sale is more than the transaction. The close involves clear communication, good presence, and written documentation.

 

The wow phase

Getting to Wow involves three key stages: Deliver and Wow, Offer More, and Referral. Deliver and wow – Fulfil your commitments on time, follow through when and where it is required. Offer to provide additional value that surprises and delights customers.

 

We put together 7 steps to help you influence your customer’s lifecycle marketing

Step 1  Welcome campaigns

  • Your content marketing has worked its magic. You’ve attracted someone to part with their email address in exchange for some juicy content.
  • Now, ease your new subscriber along to their first purchase with this.
  • A welcome campaign is an automated series of emails that’s triggered when someone joins your email list. It gives you the opportunity to introduce your brand and position your products in bite-sized chunks.
  • Design a series of messages that build a relationship between your brand and your potential customer. Help to nurture their initial interest, so it develops into an intention to purchase.

 

Step 2  Reviews and ratings

  • Reviews and ratings aid customers in the consideration stage of their lifecycle.
  • They act as a form of social proof. This helps customers to feel confident that a product will meet their needs.

 

Step 3 Browse and cart abandonment

  • Browse abandonment emails are triggered when your customer has been looking at a product but abandons their browser. This form of personalisation aims to entice the customer back to buy.
  • Cart abandonment emails are triggered when your customer puts an item in their basket but abandons your site without buying. Often, they include a discount to sweeten the deal.
  • These automations help to drive up conversion rates and are key to the conversion stage of your strategy.

 

 Step 4 Personalised call-to-action

  • Personalised call-to-action in your emails and across your website are another way to increase conversions.
  • Despite being easy to implement, they are not widely used. This allows your brand to stand out and adds to the persuasive nature of this tactic.

 

Step 5  Product recommendations

  • Product recommendations are a form of personalisation that consistently deliver, throughout the customer lifecycle.
  • They are a way to show customers products that meet their needs (consideration). They entice customer to purchase (conversion). And they remind the customer why your brand it still relevant (retention).

 

Step 6 Countdown timers

  • Countdown timers are an eye-catching feature that you can add to your emails or your website.
  • A good way to use this feature is to countdown to the beginning of an exclusive offer, or to the end of a sale. The sense of urgency they create helps drive conversions.

 

 Step 7  Re-engagement campaigns

  • An inevitable part of E-Commerce marketing is that some customers will lapse. Re-engagement campaigns are an effective way to win-back those sleeping subscribers. Whether you use “we miss you” messaging, list out benefits, or try something more tongue-in-cheek will depend on your brand’s voice.

 

Reference:

https://www.smartinsights.com/ecommerce/web-personalisation/what-is-lifecycle-marketing/

https://blog.alexa.com/customer-lifecycle-marketing/

https://www.optimove.com/learning-center/customer-lifecycle-marketing

https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/marketing-and-sales/how-we-help-clients/customer-lifecycle-management

https://www.i-scoop.eu/integrated-marketing/

https://www.smartinsights.com/ecommerce/web-personalisation/what-is-lifecycle-marketing/

https://www.pure360.com/top-tips-for-customer-lifecycle-marketing/

 

Written by Prisha Debipersad, Prisha has a love for travel and has lived in Germany and Australia, gaining work and life experience along the way. Being proudly South African she is happy to be back on her home ground. She currently is completing her masters degree as well as providing valuable support to Prana as a Marketing Assistant. .